2.2 Strand

Living things (plants and animals, including humans) need water, air, and resources from the land to survive and live in habitats that provide these necessities. The physical characteristics of plants and animals reflect the habitat in which they live. Animals also have modified behaviors that help them survive, grow, and meet their needs. Humans sometimes mimic plant and animal adaptations to survive in their environment.
STORYLINE: 2.2.1-2.2.2 Living Things and their Structures

Standard(s) 2.2.1: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about patterns of living things (plants and animals, including humans) in different habitats. Emphasize the diversity of living things on land and water habitats. Examples of patterns in habitats could include descriptions of temperature or precipitation and the types of plants and animals found inland habitats. (LS2.C, LS4.C, LS4.D)


Standard 2.2.2: Plan and carry out an investigation of the structure and function of plant and animal parts in different habitats. Emphasize how different plants and animals have different structures to survive in their habitat. Examples could include the shallow roots of a cactus in the desert or the seasonal changes in the fur coat of a wolf. (LS1.A, LS4.A, LS4.D)

Practices

Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information in K–2 builds on prior experiences and uses observations and texts to communicate new information. 

  • Read grade-appropriate texts and/or use media to obtain scientific information to describe patterns in the natural world.

 

Planning and Carrying Out Investigations 

Planning and carrying out investigations to answer questions or test solutions to problems in K–2 builds on prior experiences and progresses to simple investigations, based on fair tests, which provide data to support explanations or design solutions.  

  • Make observations (firsthand or from media) to collect data which can be used to make comparisons.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

LS1.A:  Structure and Function

All organisms have external parts. Different animals use their body parts in different ways to see, hear, grasp objects, protect themselves, move from place to place, and seek, find, and take in food, water and air. Plants also have different parts that help them survive, grow, and produce more plants.

 

LS2.C: Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience

The places where plants and animals live often change,water or food, plants and animals may not be able to live there.

 

LS4.C: Adaptation

Living things can survive only where their needs are met. If some places are too hot or too cold or have too little 

 

LS4.D: Biodiversity and Humans

There are many different kinds of living things in any area, and they exist in different places on land and in water.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Patterns

Patterns in the natural world can be observed, used to describe phenomena, and used as evidence

 

Structure and Function

Students identify that the shape and structure of an object in nature relate to its properties and functions.

Storyline Narrative

This storyline starts by engaging students with the phenomenon of “Polar bears only live in the Arctic.” Students will observe and develop questions about why a polar bear can only live in the Arctic. They will use these questions to investigate patterns of arctic animals. Students will construct explanations about the patterns identified and how they help a polar bear survive.  This will lead them into wondering what external features(structures) of plants and animals need to survive in different habitats? Students will plan and carry out investigations on different external structures of animals to determine what habitats they would live and survive in and argue from the evidence why animals need to have specific structures to function in a habitat. Students will also focus on the structures of plants by carrying out an investigation on cacti, compare other plant structures. Students will then evaluate all of the information they have collected in the storyline to develop models of a new animal/plant that’s structures would survive in a particular habitat. Students communicate about their model to the class and describe why they chose the structures for their particular habitat.

Phenomena Statement

Polar bears only live in the Arctic.

STORYLINE: 2.2.3 Seed Dispersal

Standard(s) 2.2.3: Develop and use a model that mimics the function of an animal dispersing seeds or pollinating plants. Examples could include plants that have seeds with hooks or barbs that attach themselves to animal fur, feathers, or human clothing, or dispersal through the wind, or consumption of fruit and the disposal of the pits or seeds. (LS2.A)

Practices

Developing and Using Models: Modeling in K–2 builds on prior experiences and progresses to include using and developing models (i.e., diagram, drawing, physical replica, diorama, dramatization, storyboard) that represent concrete events or design solutions.

  • Use a model to represent relationships in the natural world.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems

Plants depend on animals for pollination or to move their seeds around.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Structure and Function

The shape and stability of structures of natural and designed objects are related to their function(s).

Storyline Narrative

This storyline on animal pollination and seed dispersal begins with students observing a phenomenon, butterflies have interesting looking mouthparts that help them get food from the different flowers they stop at. Students engage in observing  pictures of butterfly mouthparts and develop questions to investigate. Students will share their observations and questions with small groups/whole class and explain their reasoning. Students then explore the structure and function of a butterfly’s mouthpart by investigating and developing a model of how butterflies get food. They will explain how the mouth part of the butterfly functions in getting food but also how butterflies pollinate plants. The students will elaborate on seed dispersal by observing  how burrs stick to things. Students will investigate and develop models to show how seeds are dispersed by animals. Students will evaluate by developing arguments from evidence to describe how animals function as a seed disperser. Students will then be assessed by drawing a model to describe how a dog can function as a seed disperser.

Phenomena Statement

Butterflies use their interesting mouthparts to eat and pollinate flowers.

STORYLINE: 2.2.4 Structures in Nature

Standard(s) 2.2.4: Design a solution to a human problem by mimicking the structure and function of plants and/or animals and how they use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs. Define the problem by asking questions and gathering information, convey designs through sketches, drawings, or physical models, and compare and test designs. Examples could include a human wearing a jacket to mimic the fur of an animal or a webbed foot to design a better swimming fin. (LS1.A, LS1.D, ETS1.A, ETS1.B, ETS1.C)

Practices

Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions in K–2 builds on prior experiences and progresses to the use of evidence and ideas in constructing evidence-based accounts of natural phenomena and designing solutions.

  • Use tools and materials provided to design and build a device that solves a specific problem or a solution to a specific problem.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

LS4.D: Biodiversity and Humans

There are many different kinds of living things in any area, and they exist in different places on land and in water.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Structure and Function

The shape and stability of structures of natural and designed objects are related to their function(s).

Storyline Narrative

This storyline begins with students observing a phenomenon, what is the structure of leaves? The students engage in investigating leaves to find patterns in the structures of the leaves. The students discuss the patterns they see in the leaves. Specifically, they discuss how the structure holds the leaves up and how their structure allows water to drain off their surfaces. 

    Students then explore by defining a human problem that they can solve by mimicking a leaf’s structure.   Students will refer back to the discussions they had about leaves and how their structures help to keep the rain from pooling on the plants as well as holding themselves up. The students can work in small groups or in pairs to design a solution to the problem. They develop models of their designs and explain their designs to the class. Students then actually create their design structure

    To elaborate, the students will design a test to determine if their structure solves the human problem they defined. To evaluate, students will develop an argument using evidence from their test to determine if they were successful in designing a solution and if not, what changes they would make.

Phenomena Statement

Leaves are very thin and flat but they are able to hold themselves up and keep water from staying on the plant too long. 

Site Feedback

Utah Science

Curriculum Consortium

Tyson Grover 

tgrover@dsdmail.net

Annette Nielson

afonnesbeck@dsdmail.net