2.3 Strand

All things are made of matter which exists with different forms and properties. Matter can be described and classified by its observable properties. Materials with certain properties are well-suited for specific uses. Heating or cooling some types of matter may or may not irreversibly change their properties.
STORYLINE: 2.3.1-2.3.2 Patterns of Properties

Standard 2.3.1: Plan and carry out an investigation to classify different kinds of materials based on patterns in their observable properties. Examples could include sorting materials based on similar properties such as strength, color, flexibility, hardness, texture, or whether the materials are solids or liquids. (PS1.A)


Standard 2:3:2: Construct an explanation showing how the properties of materials influence their intended use and function.  Examples could include using wood as a building material because it is lightweight and strong or the use of concrete, steel, or cotton due to their unique properties. (PS1.A)

Practices

Planning and Carrying Out Investigations to answer questions or test solutions to problems in K–2 builds on prior experiences and progresses to simple investigations, based on fair tests, which provide data to support explanations or design solutions.

  • Make observations (firsthand or from media) to collect data that can be used to make comparisons.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS1.A: Structure and Properties of Matter Different kinds of matter exist and many of them can be either solid or liquid, depending on temperature. Matter can be described and classified by its observable properties.

Storyline Narrative

Students will begin this storyline by recognizing that they can describe materials by observable properties. They will engage by identifying items in “mystery boxes” through verbal descriptions.   They will then explore materials, and discover they can be described and classified by the properties of color, texture, hardness, and flexibility.  They will explain the patterns that different materials share.  Students will elaborate by designing and conducting an investigation to describe and classify materials.  They will then evaluate by constructing an explanation to show that properties of materials influence their intended use and function by creating a small house that can hold an eraser on top and describing their decision making process in building the house.

Phenomena Statement

 I don’t have to see something to have a good guess of what it is.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Patterns

Patterns in the natural world can be observed, used to describe phenomena, and used as evidence.

STORYLINE: 2.3.3 Restructuring Matter

Standard(s) 2.3.3: Develop and use a model to describe how an object, made of a small set of pieces, can be disassembled and reshaped into a new object with a different function. Emphasize that a great variety of objects can be built from a small set of pieces. Examples of pieces could include wooden blocks or building bricks. (PS1.A)

Practices

Developing and Using Models: Modeling in K–2 builds on prior experiences and progresses to include using and developing models (i.e., diagram, drawing, physical replica, diorama, dramatization, storyboard) that represent concrete events or design solutions.

  • Use a model to represent relationships in the natural world.‚Äč

Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS1.A: Structure and Properties of Matter Different properties are suited to different purposes. 

A great variety of objects can be built up from a small set of pieces.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Structure and Function

The shape and stability of structures of natural and designed objects are related to their function(s).

Storyline Narrative

Students will engage by examining a broken small electronic appliance.  They will investigate the structure and function of small appliances such as CD players, calculators, modems, headphones, computer keyboards, etc.  They will explore as they disassemble an appliance and explain by using a model to describe how the larger object is made of a small set of pieces.  They will elaborate by planning and carrying out an investigation to reassemble the small pieces into a new object with a new structure and function.  They will evaluate as they use a model to describe the new object made from the small pieces.

Phenomena Statement

Big things are made of small parts.

STORYLINE: 2.3.4 Changing Matter

Standard(s) 2.3.4: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about changes in matter caused by heating or cooling.  Emphasize that some changes can be reversed and some cannot.  Examples of reversible changes could include freezing water or melting crayons.  Examples of irreversible changes could include cooking an egg or burning wood. (PS1.B)

Practices

Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information in K–2 builds on prior experiences and uses observations and texts to communicate new information. 

  • Read grade-appropriate texts and/or use media to obtain scientific information to describe patterns in the natural world.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS1.B: Chemical Reactions

Heating or cooling a substance may cause changes that can be observed. Sometimes these changes are reversible, and sometimes they are not.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Cause and Effect

Events have causes that generate observable patterns.

Storyline Narrative

Students will engage by obtaining information about the changes in matter caused by heating or cooling by examining a chocolate bar left in a hot car.  Students will construct an explanation describing that heating the chocolate bar has caused changes that can be reversed.  They will then obtain information by exploring several demonstrations such as cooking an egg  and melting an ice cube. Students will evaluate the changes as being reversible or irreversible.  Students will explain by communicating information about reversible and irreversible changes as they analyze matter being heated or cooled in several video examples.  Students will then elaborate as they  plan and carry out an investigation to show that changes in matter are caused by heating or cooling matter.  They will then communicate information about their investigation.  Student will evaluate through an assessment that will include analyzing reversible and irreversible changes in cookie dough that has been caused by heating or cooling.

Phenomena Statement

A chocolate bar left in a hot car melts into a gooey liquid.

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Tyson Grover 

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Annette Nielson

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