5.2 Strand

All substances are composed of matter. Matter is made of particles that are too small to be seen but still exist and can be detected by other means. Substances have specific properties by which they can be identified. When two or more different substances are combined, a new substance with different properties may be formed. Whether a change results in a new substance or not, the total amount of matter is always conserved.

STORYLINE: 5.2.1 Particles of Matter

Standard(s) 5.2.1 Develop and use a model to describe that matter is made of particles on a scale that is too small to be seen. Emphasize making observations of changes supported by a particle model of matter. Examples could include adding air to expand a balloon, compressing air in a syringe, adding food coloring to water, or dissolving salt in water and evaporating the water. The use of the terms atoms and molecules will be taught in Grades 6 through 8. (PS1.A)

Practices

Develop and use a model

Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information

Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS1.A: Structure and Properties of Matter

  • The amount (weight) of matter is conserved when it changes form, even in transitions in which it seems to vanish.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Scale, proportion, quantity

Matter and energy

Structure and function

Cause and effect

Storyline Narrative

To begin the storyline, students will engage by observing the phenomenon of bubbles forming in a liquid when a gas is inserted. Observations and questions will be recorded. Students will explore how they interact with different phases of matter to help them develop a model of what matter is made of on a small scale. Students will obtain information about the particle model of matter and explain and elaborate their understanding of the particles found in solids, liquids, and gases by revising their models. Students will be evaluated on their understanding with a performance assessment that includes developing models for three systems that include balloons and soda bottles.

Phenomena Statement

Students blow through a straw into water and observe the results.

STORYLINE: 5.2.2 Properties of Matter

Standard 5.2.2: Ask questions to plan and carry out investigations to identify substances based on patterns of their properties. Emphasize using properties to identify substances. Examples of properties could include color, hardness, conductivity, solubility, or a response to magnetic forces. Examples of substances could include powders, metals, minerals, or liquids. (PS1.A)

Practices

Ask questions

Plan and carry out investigations

Analyze data

Engage in argument from evidence

Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS1.A: Structure and Properties of Matter

  • The amount (weight) of matter is conserved when it changes form, even in transitions in which it seems to vanish.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Patterns

Storyline Narrative

Students engage with the phenomenon that different types of matter have different properties by observing the similarities and differences between salt and sugar, especially when used in a recipe. Students will then explore the patterns of substances’ properties by planning and carrying out an investigation. Students will analyze the data from the investigation and explain their understanding by constructing an explanation of the patterns found in the data. Finally, students will elaborate by participating in a ‘crime scene investigation.’ They will obtain information about properties of different substances and construct an argument about the solution of the crime, which will be used to evaluate their understanding.

Phenomena Statement

Different types of matter, such as salt and sugar, have different properties.

Storyline: 5.2.3-4 Changes of Matter

5.2.3: Plan and carry out investigations to determine the effect of combining two or more substances. Emphasize whether a new substance is or is not created by the formation of a new substance with different properties. Examples could include combining vinegar and baking soda or rusting an iron nail in water. (PS1.B)

5.2.4: Use mathematics and computational thinking to provide evidence that regardless of the type of change that occurs when heating, cooling, or combining substances, the total weight of matter is conserved.

Practices

Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information

Plan and carry out investigations

Use mathematics and computational thinking

Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS1.A: Structure and Properties of Matter

  • The amount (weight) of matter is conserved when it changes form, even in transitions in which it seems to vanish.

 

PS1.B:  Chemical Reactions

  • When two or more different substances are mixed, a new substance with different properties may be formed. 

Cross Cutting Concepts

Cause & Effect

Matter

Systems

Storyline Narrative

To begin the storyline, students will engage with a phenomenon by observing the effects of mixing sugar with two clear liquids.  Observations and questions will be recorded. Students will explore by investigating analogous phenomenon during the course of two episodes. Students will use evidence from investigations to explain their understanding of the effects of combining substances. Students will elaborate on the cause of the phenomenon by obtaining information from an informational text. Students will then explore and explain the effect on weight of matter as it is heated, cooled, or combined. Students will be evaluated on their understanding on a summative assessment.

Phenomena Statement

Students watch a demonstration and a video to observe two different outcomes when sugar combined with two different clear liquids. 

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Utah Science

Curriculum Consortium

Tyson Grover 

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Annette Nielson

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