1.2 Strand

Living things (plants and animals, including humans) depend on their surroundings to get what they need, including food, water, shelter, and a favorable temperature. Plants and animals have external features that allow them to survive in a variety of environments. Young plants and animals are similar but not exactly like their parents. In many kinds of animals, parents and offspring engage in behaviors that help the offspring to survive.
STORYLINE: 1.2.1 Effects of Sunlight and Water on Plants
 

Standard(s) 1.2.1: Plan and carry out an investigation to determine the effect of sunlight and water on plant growth. Emphasize investigations that test one variable at a time. (LS1.C)

Practices

Planning and Carrying Out Investigations to answer questions or test solutions to problems in K–2 builds on prior experiences and progresses to simple investigations, based on fair tests, which provide data to support explanations or design solutions.

  • Make observations (firsthand or from media) to collect data that can be used to make comparisons.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

LS1.C: Organization for Matter and Energy Flow in Organisms Plants need water and light to live and grow.

 

Features of living things supporting organisms in their environment is not discussed in the K-2 NGSS

Cross Cutting Concepts

Cause and Effect: Events have causes that generate observable patterns.

Storyline Narrative

This tells the story of what will happen in the classroom and why students will explore the presented phenomenon. It contains descriptions of student performance (SEP) and how they are being asked to frame their thinking (CCC).

Note: This storyline needs to have live plants to conduct an investigation.  If you choose as a teacher to have students plant seeds to grow into plants, please plan to do that 3-4 weeks before this lesson. Seedlings earlier than two weeks will still have nutrients stored in the seed that could affect the investigation. It would probably be easiest to have small plants ahead of the lesson by purchasing plants ready for the investigation. Also, be aware of any allergies that may cause safety issues when using live plants.

This storyline starts with students exploring what plants need to grow with the focus on water and sunlight. In a class discussion, students develop questions about the effect observed in videos, and/or photographs of a forgotten plant that has died. Students obtain information about the matter and energy that plants need to grow through readings about the needs of plants. Students plan and carry out an investigation to determine how matter (water) and energy (sunlight) affects a plant’s growth. Students will work in small groups of 2-3 students and decide how they will investigate the effect of no sunlight or no water with the supplies provided and set up their investigation. Over the next few weeks, students analyze data patterns to determine the  effects of different amounts of water or sunlight in their data. Students write to communicate their explanation of the effects of water and sunlight on plant growth.

Phenomena Statement

 I left on vacation and when I came back I saw that my plant died.

STORYLINE: 1.2.2-1.2.3 Patterns of External Features in Plants
 

Standard(s) 1.2.2: Construct an explanation by observing patterns of external features of living things that survive in different locations. Emphasize how plants and nonhuman animals, found in specific surroundings, share similar physical characteristics. Examples could include that plants living in dry areas are more likely to have thick outer coatings that hold in water. (LS1.A, LS1.D)


Standard(s) 1.2.3: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the patterns of plants and nonhuman animals that are alike, but not exactly like, their parents. An example could include that most carrots are orange and shaped like a cone but may be different sizes or have differing tastes. (LS3.A, LS3.B)

Practices

Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions in K–2 builds on prior experiences and progresses to the use of evidence and ideas in constructing evidence-based accounts of natural phenomena and designing solutions.

  • Use tools and materials provided to design and build a device that solves a specific problem or a solution to a specific problem.

 

Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information in K–2 builds on prior experiences and uses observations and texts to communicate new information. 

  • Read grade-appropriate texts and/or use media to obtain scientific information to describe patterns in the natural world.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

LS3.A: Inheritance of Traits

Plants also are very much, but not exactly, like their parents. 

 

LS3.B: Variation of Traits

Individuals of the same kind of plant or animal are recognizable as similar but can also vary in many ways.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Patterns in the natural world can be observed, used to describe phenomena, and used as evidence.

Phenomena Statement

Plants are different in my flower garden, then in the mountains.

Storyline Narrative

This tells the story of what will happen in the classroom and why students will explore the presented phenomenon. It contains descriptions of student performance (SEP) and how they are being asked to frame their thinking (CCC).

In this storyline, students will be looking at patterns in plants' external features.  The first episode has students observing pictures of plants in the garden and in the mountain and compare (patterns) how their external features are similar and different. Students construct an explanation in class discussion about the patterns they have observed in the different locations and communicate by writing and/or drawing the patterns of external features observed in plants in a flower garden versus plants on the mountain. 

The next episode, students observe pictures of gardens in different locations and compare (patterns) how their external features are similar and different. Students construct an explanation in class discussion to describe patterns of external features of plants in different locations. The students will write and/or draw to construct an explanation to describe the similarities and differences of patterns observed of external features of the plants in different locations.

The final episode focuses on how plants are like their parent plant, but not exactly alike. Students begin by observing pictures of a young apple tree versus an mature apple tree and find patterns in their appearances. Students obtain information from a reading about plants and their appearances and evaluate the information from the reading to describe the patterns between the young apple tree and the mature apple tree. Students use evidence in discussion from the apple tree photographs and reading to predict what patterns they would expect if you planted carrot seeds. Students communicate information about patterns between a plant and the plants they came from with pumpkin and sunflower plants.

 
STORYLINE: 1.2.2 - 1.2.4 Animals - Inheritance and Variation

Standard(s) 1.2.2: Construct an explanation by observing patterns of external features of living things that survive in different locations. Emphasize how plants and nonhuman animals, found in specific surroundings, share similar physical characteristics. Examples could include that plants living in dry areas are more likely to have thick outer coatings that hold in water, animals living in cold locations have longer and thicker fur, or most desert animals are awake at night. (LS1.A, LS1.D) 

 

Standard(s) 1.2.3: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the patterns of plants and nonhuman animals that are alike, but not exactly like, their parents. An example could include that most carrots are orange and shaped like a cone but may be different sizes or have differing tastes. (LS3.A, LS3.B) 

Standard(s) 1.2.4: Construct an explanation of the patterns in the behaviors of parents and offspring which help offspring to survive. Examples of behavioral patterns could include the signals that offspring make such as crying, chirping, and other vocalizations or the responses of the parents such as feeding, comforting, and protecting the offspring. (LS1.B)

Practices

Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information in K–2 builds on prior experiences and uses observations and texts to communicate new information. 

  • Read grade-appropriate texts and/or use media to obtain scientific information to describe patterns in the natural world.


Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions in K–2 builds on prior experiences and progresses to the use of evidence and ideas in constructing evidence-based accounts of natural phenomena and designing solutions.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

LS3.A: Inheritance of Traits

Plants also are very much, but not exactly, like their parents. 

 

LS3.B: Variation of Traits

Individuals of the same kind of plant or animal are recognizable as similar but can also vary in many ways.

LS1.B: Growth and Development of Organisms

Adult plants and animals can have young. In many kinds of animals, parents and the offspring themselves engage in behaviors that help the offspring to survive.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Patterns in the natural world can be observed, used to describe phenomena, and used as evidence.

Phenomena Statement

Baby animals are adorable with small features.

Storyline Narrative

This tells the story of what will happen in the classroom and why students will explore the presented phenomenon. It contains descriptions of student performance (SEP) and how they are being asked to frame their thinking (CCC).

Students will observe multiple pictures and identify patterns of similar features in baby animals and their parents and obtain information by reading about patterns of features between baby animals and their parents. After reading and observing pictures of animals and their babies, students will evaluate in a class discussion the patterns of features they have observed to construct an explanation describing the relationship of features between animal parents and their babies. Finally, students communicate by writing and/or drawing the patterns of features between animal parents and their babies. 

 

This episode has students observing pictures of baby animals in different locations and comparing (patterns) how their external features are similar and different. In a class discussion, students construct an explanation to describe patterns of external features of baby animals in different locations. Then in the student journals, students write and/or draw to communicate patterns of external features of baby animals in two different locations.


This episode focuses on the behaviors animals pass or teach to their offspring to help them to survive. Students obtain information by reading and watching animal videos depicting patterns of behaviors of animal parents and their offspring that help them survive. Then, students evaluate the patterns of animal behaviors to construct an explanation for the purpose of the behavior to help feed, comfort or protect their offspring. Finally, students write and/or draw to communicate their explanations for patterns in animal behaviors between offspring and parent.