1.1 Strand

Seasonal patterns of motion of the Sun, Moon, and stars can be observed, described, and predicted. These patterns may vary depending on the region, location, or time of year.
STORYLINE: 1.1.1  &1.1.3 Patterns in the Sky
 

Standard 1.1.1: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the movement of the Sun, Moon, and stars to describe predictable patterns. Examples of patterns could include how the Sun and Moon appear to rise in one part of the sky, move across the sky, and set; or how stars, other than the Sun, are visible at night but not during the day. (ESS1.A) 


Standard 1.1.3: Design a device that measures the varying patterns of daylight. Define the problem by asking questions and gathering information, convey designs through sketches, drawings, or physical models, and compare and test designs. Examples could include sundials for telling the time or tracking the movement of shadows throughout the day. (ESS1.B, ETS1.A, ETS1.B, ETS1.C)

Practices

Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information in K–2 builds on prior experiences and uses observations and texts to communicate new information. 

  • Read grade-appropriate texts and/or use media to obtain scientific information to describe patterns in the natural world.

 

Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions in K–2 builds on prior experiences and progresses to the use of evidence and ideas in constructing evidence-based accounts of natural phenomena and designing solutions.

  • Use tools and materials provided to design and build a device that solves a specific problem or a solution to a specific problem.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS1.A: The Universe and Its Stars

Patterns of the motion of the sun, moon, and stars in the sky can be observed, described, and predicted.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Patterns in the natural world can be observed, used to describe phenomena, and used as evidence.

Phenomena Statement

During the school day we see the sun as it moves across the sky. 

Storyline Narrative

This storyline begins with students obtaining information about the pattern of only seeing the sun during the day. Students will evaluate the pattern of only seeing the sun in the day from observations and communicate the pattern. Students then observe the movement of the sun across the sky to obtain information. Students will observe the pattern of the sun being in different places in the sky during different times of the day for multiple days to show this pattern is consistent. Students will communicate this pattern by modeling the sun in different parts of the sky throughout the day. 

Students obtain information about the pattern of how shadows change shape and move throughout the day through observation. Students will evaluate information gathered and observed and communicate a pattern of the movement with shadows. To show this pattern is consistent and predictable students design a tool to track the pattern in the movement of shadows throughout the day. Students will record data of their changing shadow in student journals. Students communicate this pattern by writing and drawing a model. 


Continuing through this storyline students will investigate that there is a predictable pattern in what we see in the night sky. This investigation will include having students plan and carry out an investigation to help with reasoning of the pattern of only seeing stars at night.

STORYLINE: 1.1.2 Patterns in the Sky
 

Standard 1.1.2: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the patterns observed at different times of the year to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year. Emphasize the variation in daylight patterns at different times of the day and at different times of the year. Examples could include varying locations and regions throughout the state, country, and world. (ESS1.B)

Practices

Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information in K–2 builds on prior experiences and uses observations and texts to communicate new information. 

  • Read grade-appropriate texts and/or use media to obtain scientific information to describe patterns in the natural world.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS1.B: Earth and the Solar System

Seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset can be observed, described, and predicted.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Patterns in the natural world can be observed, used to describe phenomena, and used as evidence.

Phenomena Statement

In the summer, we can play outside after dinner.

Storyline Narrative

This storyline starts with students exploring that there is more sunlight in the summer than any other season. Students will obtain and evaluate data and develop questions about the differing amounts of sunlight through the seasons. Students will communicate this pattern by understanding that the sun is in the sky for a longer period of time in the summer than in the winter. Students will next explore that the summer has warmer temperatures than in winter. Students will use background knowledge and evaluate data to show the patterns of having warmer temperatures in the summer than in the winter. Students will communicate their understanding by writing that there is a pattern of warmer temperatures in the summer and cooler temperatures in the winter.


This storyline will conclude with the students applying their understanding of the patterns of more daylight and warmer temperatures in the summer than in winter to explore the phenomenon that trees are more leafy and green in the summer than in the winter. Students will obtain information through the observation of trees in the spring, summer, fall, and winter. In a class discussion students will identify what is needed for a tree to survive, which includes sunlight, water, and warmer temperatures. With this understanding, students will be able to communicate that since the summer has more daylight and warmer temperatures this causes the pattern of trees being more leafy and green in the summer than in the winter. For the assessment students will communicate the seasonal daylight patterns by modeling if it is light or dark outside when they eat dinner in the summer and winter. Students will also communicate seasonal daylight patterns by evaluating short stories to determine the season.

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Utah Science

Curriculum Consortium

Tyson Grover 

tgrover@dsdmail.net

Annette Nielson

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