Site Feedback

Utah Science

Curriculum Consortium

Tyson Grover 

tgrover@dsdmail.net

Annette Nielson

afonnesbeck@dsdmail.net

SEEd Standard 6.1.3 asks students to use computational thinking to analyze and determine the scale and properties of objects in the solar system. Examples of scale could include size and distances. Examples of properties could include layers, temperature, surface features, and orbital radius. Data source could include Earth and space-based instruments such as telescopes and satellites. Types of data could include graphs, data tables, drawings, photographs, and models.

 

In this storyline, students engage in observing patterns and making predictions about Galileo’s work on the moons of Jupiter. Students interpret patterns to determine the motion of Jupiter’s moons. Students make sense of and interpret data by formatting it in different ways, such as charts and graphs.

 

Students explore by using computational thinking and  analyzing multiple sets of data from NASA’s Planet Profiles into tables and charts based on patterns they can observe. Students take a close look at the different properties of each of the planets, including mass, distance from the sun, temperature, revolution period etc. and determine where there are patterns and correlations between the different planets. Students will argue about correlations found among different properties of the planets based on evidence from the data. Students argue that the scale and properties of objects in the solar system correlate with other properties within the solar system.

 

Students explain using the data and arguments to construct explanations for how different properties affect celestial objects in the solar system. Students elaborate that distance from the sun, diameter, density, surface features, structure, scale,  and composition often follow trends we can observe through data.

 

Students research the different types of technology being used to learn about space. Different types of technology including, photographs from the the space based telescopes, space probes, and other technologies. Students will communicate that technology is vastly different from Galileo’s time and even from ten years ago.

 

To evaluate student’s proficiency students are assessed on their use of evidence in their constructed explanations of the phenomena.

Storyline Narrative 6.1.3

Episode 1

Question

How do we learn about space?

Snapshot

Students look at some of Galileo's work and make sense of graphs to find patterns and make predictions.  

Conceptual Understandings

Galileo took data on the moons of Jupiter using a telescope. We can format data in different ways to help interpret and make sense of data.

Can I make sense of other sets of data?

 

Conceptual Understandings

Comparing data often allows us to find trends and make sense of things in the universe that we can’t readily investigate and manipulate. The scale and properties of objects in the solar system correlate with other properties within the solar system. Distance from the sun, diameter, density, surface features, structure, and composition often follow trends we can observe through data.

What technology has helped us gather this data?

Snapshot

Students look at the data from NASA known as the Planet Profiles. Students look for patterns across all planets according to the data. Using information from the data, students format data into a table and then a graph. Students use their graphs to determine if there is a correlation among different properties of the planets. Students present and argue the trends they are seeing using evidence from the data.

Episode 2

Question

Can I make sense of other sets of data?

 

Episode 3

Question

What technology has helped us gather this data?

Snapshot

Students research the different technologies being used to learn about space. They present their research to the class.

Conceptual Understandings

Technology is vastly different from Galileo's time, and even from 10 years ago. The technology in 10 years from now might teach us much more.

Can I use computational thinking to analyze data about objects in the solar system?


Can I determine through analysis that planets are massively different in size, distance from the sun, mass, layers, temperature, orbital radius, and surface features?