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Utah Science

Curriculum Consortium

Tyson Grover 

tgrover@dsdmail.net

Annette Nielson

afonnesbeck@dsdmail.net

SEEd Standard 6.3.2 asks students to investigate the interactions between air masses that cause changes in weather conditions. Collect and analyze weather data to provide evidence for how air masses flow from regions of high pressure to low pressure causing a change in weather. Examples of data collection could include field observations, laboratory experiments, weather maps, or diagrams.

 

As we begin our storyline, we engage students by having them watch a videos of thunderstorms coming in. Students discuss patterns in the energy and matter they see and the relationship between weather and fronts. Students determine that there are differences in air masses. The low pressure (L) occurs along the lines or boundaries and there is high pressure (H) in the middle of these boundaries. Students determine that weather is happening along the boundaries. Students are left wondering what causes changes in weather.

 

In order to explore this question, students investigate by analyzing four current maps of the United States that show wind, temperature, radar and fronts. They look for patterns to determine if there is a relationship between the four maps and changes in weather. To elaborate and expand their understanding, students collect and analyze data that is relevant to determining the relationships between patterns of activity of air masses and if these patterns cause change in weather conditions. Based on the patterns that are observed, students predict and construct an explanation of what they will see on the next day’s map. Students determine that wind is moving in different directions and is blowing because of the differences in air pressure.  

 

Students determine if their predictions were correct by comparing their predictions with the current day’s maps and explain why their guesses were correct or not. To elaborate, students then revise their predictions and develop a plan to carry out an investigation. Students determine if their predictions were more accurate than the previous day's predictions. Students develop their models further and discuss what is causing the changes. Based on evidence from their investigations, students determine that weather can vary from day to day and place to place.


To evaluate their understanding, students apply what they have learned about the interactions between air masses that cause changes in weather conditions by looking at a weather map and data to correctly make predictions.

Storyline Narrative 6.3.2

Conceptual Understandings

There are differences in air masses. The low pressure (L) occurs along the lines or boundaries.  There is high pressure (H) in the middle of these boundaries. Weather happens along the boundaries.

Why is water found at these locations and in different states?

Snapshot

Show a video of thunderstorms coming in. Have students discuss patterns in the energy and matter they see and the relationship between weather and fronts.

Episode 1

Question

What causes weather?

 

Episode 2

Question

What causes changes in weather?

Snapshot

Students investigate by analyzing four current maps of the United States: wind, temperature, radar, and fronts. They look for patterns to determine if there is a relationship between the four maps and changes in weather. Students collect and analyze data that is relevant to determining the relationships between patterns of activity of air masses and changes in weather conditions. The patterns are changed into questions. Students predict what they expect to see on the next day’s map.

Conceptual Understandings

Wind is moving in different directions and is blowing because of differences in air pressure.  If there is a high pressure area that is near a low pressure area or if there is a great difference in air pressure, it will result in very strong winds to blow.

Is my prediction correct?

 

Conceptual Understandings

Weather can vary from day to day and place to place . Multiple variables such as humidity, temperature, pressure, and solar radiation contribute to the variability in weather.  

How can I apply what I have learned to predict the current weather?

Snapshot

Students use the current day’s maps to determine if their predictions are correct and to develop a model to answer their questions. Students revise their predictions and develop a plan to carry out an investigation. Students determine if their predictions were more accurate than the previous day’s predictions. Students develop their model further and discuss what is causing the changes.  

Episode 3

Question

Is my prediction correct?