Storyline Narrative 7.1.1

Standard 1.1.1: Carry out an investigation which provides evidence that a change in an object's motion is dependent
on the mass of the object and the sum of the forces acting on it. Various experimental designs should be evaluated to
determine how well the investigation measures an object's motion
. Emphasize conceptual understanding of Newton's
First and Second Laws. Calculations will focus on one dimension; the use of vectors will be introduced in high school.


Student Friendly Objectives: I can investigate and show that a change in an object’s motion depends on the object’s
mass and the forces acting on it.
I can evaluate designs that best measure an object's motion.


Anchor Phenomenon: Skiers and drag racers can change their motion.


Big Idea: The change in motion of an object depends on its mass and forces acting on it.

To engage students, they are shown video clips of two Winter Olympic sports, bobsledding and ski jumping. Students
record observations about the stability and change in motion of the bobsledders and skiers.


Students explore and explain Newton’s 1st Law through demonstrations and carrying out a small investigation.
Students define terms as they explore the concept. Students demonstrate that an object at rest stays at rest until acted on
by an unbalanced force as they place a battery on top of a card which sits on top of a cup, flick the card away, and the
battery drops straight down into the cup.


Students explore and explain Newton’s 2nd Law through a series of two investigations. In the first investigation, students
roll batteries of different masses down a ramp (of constant height) to recognize that the more mass an object has, the
greater the force needs to be to accelerate its mass. In the second investigation, the students do not vary the mass of the
battery, but instead change the ramp height. The varying ramp height will produce different accelerations allowing
students to see that the acceleration of an object can affect the force that is exerted on a mass.


Students elaborate on the knowledge they have gained by applying this knowledge to a new system, bowling, where
objects of different masses collide. Students plan and carry out an investigation to demonstrate that the motion of the
bowling ball and the pins depends on their mass and the forces acting on them.


Students are evaluated on their understanding of Newton’s 1st and 2nd Laws of motion as they explain how the motion of
a hockey puck depends on its mass and the forces acting on it.

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Episode 1

Question

What can affect or change the motion of an object?

Snapshot

Students watch videos about bobsledding and ski jumping, record observations, recognize patterns, and generate  questions involving Newton’s 1st and 2nd Laws of Motion

Conceptual Understandings

Forces and mass can change the acceleration of an object. Objects do not change their motion unless a force acts on the object.

Why does an object that is not moving start moving?

 

Conceptual Understandings

Objects at rest stay at rest and objects in motion stay in motion unless acted on by an outside force.

How does mass affect the motion of an object?

Snapshot

Students observe objects at rest and objects in motion and determine why they start or stop moving.

Episode 2

Question

Why does an object that is not moving start moving?

Episode 3

Question

How does mass affect the motion of an object?

Snapshot

Students roll batteries of various sizes down a ramp and into a cup to determine how mass can affect the motion of the cup.

Conceptual Understandings

Objects with more mass create a larger force and therefore greater acceleration than objects with small mass.

How does the acceleration of an object affect motion?

 
 

Conceptual Understandings

Objects with greater accelerations generate a larger force on an object than objects with smaller accelerations.

How do the forces acting on an object and the mass of the object change the object’s motion?

Snapshot

Students roll batteries down ramps of varying heights into a cup to determine how the acceleration of the battery affects the motion of the cup

Episode 4

Question

How does acceleration of an object affect motion?

 

Episode 5

Question

How do the forces acting on an object and the mass of the object change the object’s motion?

Snapshot

Student’s bowl with objects of different masses to demonstrate that the motion or acceleration of the object depends on its mass and the forces on the object.

Conceptual Understandings

The motion of an object does not change until an unbalanced force acts on the object. Objects with more mass require greater force to make them accelerate. Objects with greater mass and greater acceleration exert a greater force on other objects.

 
 
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Curriculum Consortium

Tyson Grover 

tgrover@dsdmail.net

Annette Nielson

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