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Utah Science

Curriculum Consortium

Tyson Grover 

tgrover@dsdmail.net

Annette Nielson

afonnesbeck@dsdmail.net

Storyline Narrative 7.1.3

Standard 7.1.3: Construct a model using observational evidence that describes the nature of fields exist between objects that exert forces on each other even though the objects are not in contact. Emphasize the cause and effect relationship between properties of objects (such as magnets or electrically-charged objects) and the forces they exert.

Student Friendly Objective: I can create a model that shows forces exist between objects even when they are not touching.

Anchor Phenomenon: See phenomenon video showing iron filings.

Big Idea: There are forces between objects that can affect them, even if they are not touching.

Anchor Phenomena: There are forces between objects that can affect them, even if they are not touching.

After learning about forces between objects that collided in the last standard, students will learn about forces between objects that do not touch for this standard, namely magnetism. Students are engaged in this topic through observing a compass and describing what causes the compass to work. They will further explore the force magnetism as they observe the effects of a magnet on the compass. Through these activities, students learn that forces between objects can have an effect on them, even when the objects are not touching.

 

Students will further explain the effects magnets can have on objects as they use iron filings to make a model of the magnetic field of a magnet. They also use a computer simulation to further observe and understand these magnetic fields. The students will be able to explain that similar magnetic poles or electric charges repel each other because the lines of force in the fields push away from each other while opposite magnetic poles and electric charges are attracted to each other because the lines of force in the fields join together.

 

Students elaborate on their knowledge as they once again consider the compass and a magnet, this time through a computer simulation. Students demonstrate that a magnet or the magnetic field of the earth has an effect on the needle of a compass. Students will use their knowledge of magnetic fields to explain some unexpected readings from a the compass and then draw a model of the magnetic field of the earth.


Student knowledge is evaluated as students draw a model of the magnetic fields between two sets of magnets, one set with like poles and one set with opposite poles. Students also explain whether this field will cause the two magnets to be attracted or repelled from each other.

You found the secret message! Huzzah!

Episode 1

Question

Can there be a force between objects that are not touching?

Snapshot

a. Students determine what causes a compass to work and describe the effect that a magnet has on the compass.

b. Students observe, describe, and ask questions about how iron filings interact with magnets, and with each other.

Conceptual Understandings

Forces, like magnetism, exist between objects that are not touching each other.

Why do magnets have forces that attract them to some objects and repel them from others?

 

Conceptual Understandings

Opposite magnetic charges attract because the lines of force in their magnetic fields join together while similar charges repel because their lines of force push apart.

How does a magnetic compass really work?

Snapshot

Students make models of magnetic fields with bar magnets and iron filings and computer simulations.

Episode 2

Question

Why do magnets have forces that attract them to some objects and repel them from others?

 

Episode 3

Question

How does a magnetic compass really work?

Snapshot

Students use a computer simulation to model the earth’s magnetic field and explain unexpected readings from the compass.

Conceptual Understandings

The compass needle is a small magnet. The north end of the needle is attracted to the south magnetic pole of Earth. The south magnetic pole is near the geographic North Pole. Attraction and repulsion forces of a magnet causes the needle of a compass to point south at or near the geographic North and South Poles.