Site Feedback

Utah Science

Curriculum Consortium

Tyson Grover 

tgrover@dsdmail.net

Annette Nielson

afonnesbeck@dsdmail.net

Storyline Narrative 7.3.1

Standard 7.3.1: Plan and carry out an investigation that provides evidence that the basic structures of living things are cells. Emphasize that cells can form single-celled or multicellular organisms and that multicellular organisms are made of different types of cells.

Student Objective: I can do an investigation to provide evidence that all living things are made of cells.

Anchor Phenomenon: Dr. Semmelweis noticed a difference in patient death rates when doctors started washing their hands.

Big Idea: All living things are made of cells

 

Students are introduced to the differences between living and nonliving things through observations of images taken with and without a microscope. Students will investigate that living things have a cellular structure while nonliving things do not. Students are engaged in episode 1 examining  pictures of living and nonliving things without magnification. Students explore pictures with magnification and notice the difference between living and nonliving things. While they may have a basic understanding of differences, they may not know that living things are made of cells. Episode 1 will let them identify differences between living and nonliving things. They will be identifying structures and patterns through observation, categorizing them, and explaining why they created those categories.

 

In episode 2, students explore both single-celled and multicellular organisms, first by analyzing the story of Dr. Ignaz Semmelweis and constructing an explanation and then by reading about Anton Van Leewenhoek and making observations of single- and multicellular organisms with and without a microscope. In their investigation will explain the similarities and differences between the structure of the cells and construct simple explanations of the differences between single-celled and multicellular organisms.

 

In episode 3, Students elaborate on their knowledge of cells by first recognizing that cells in multicellular organisms are different from each other and have different structures and  functions that fulfill different needs in the organism, such as muscle cells for movement and nerve cells for communication. Students will gain this knowledge by looking at different differentiated cells through a microscope.


In the final assessment, students are evaluated on how well they can investigate and  identify living versus nonliving things, recognize single-celled versus multicellular organisms, and explain how multicellular organisms have differentiated cells.

You found the secret message! Huzzah!

Episode 1

Question

What is the difference between living and nonliving things?

Snapshot

Students investigate images of living and nonliving things to determine similarities and differences in structure.

Conceptual Understandings

Living things have characteristics that are observable with and without a microscope that differentiate them from nonliving things.

What types of cells are living things made of?

Can we identify living things as single-celled or multicellular?

 

Conceptual Understandings

Living things can be single-celled or multicellular.

Are there differences in the cells of a multicellular organism?

Snapshot

Students are presented with information about Dr. Ignaz Semmelweis and Anton Van Leewenhoek and the discovery of bacteria, then look at the structure of simple vs. complex cells. Students are also exposed to other single cell organisms.

Episode 2

Question

What types of cells are living things made of? Can we identify living things as single-celled or multicellular?

 

Episode 3

Question

Are there differences in the cells of a multicellular organism?

Snapshot

Using microscopes, students will identify the function of certain cells in their body while also recognizing the differences in the cell structures, such as a nerve cell compared to a muscle cell.

Conceptual Understandings

Multicellular organisms contain different types of cells.