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Utah Science

Curriculum Consortium

Tyson Grover 

tgrover@dsdmail.net

Annette Nielson

afonnesbeck@dsdmail.net

Storyline Narrative 8.2.4

Standard 8.2.4 : Use computational thinking to describe a simple model for waves that shows the pattern of wave amplitude being related to wave energy. Emphasize describing waves with both quantitative and qualitative thinking. Examples could include using graphs, charts, computer simulations, or physical models to demonstrate amplitude and energy correlation.

 

Student Friendly Objective: I can draw a model that shows the patterns of how a wave’s amplitude is related to the energy of the wave.

 

Episode 1: Phenomenon: Students will make observations about the Nakalele Blowhole phenomenon, come up with a possible explanation for the phenomenon, and ask questions about the patterns they observed. They will share their observations and questions with the class.

 

Episode 2: In this episode the students will be using computer simulation models and physical models to become familiar with what a wave is. They will identify examples of different types of waves and the parts of a wave (i.e. amplitude, wavelength, and frequency). They will identify that it is energy that is transferred by a wave, not matter.

 

Episode 3: Students will conduct an experiment to discover how wave height (amplitude) is related to wave energy. They will transform gravitational potential energy to mechanical wave energy by dropping an object from different heights into a bin half filled with water. Using computational thinking the students will graph their results and describe the patterns they observe between the initial energy of the object and the resulting water motion.

They will then practice interpreting graphs of real data to recognize that there is a pattern of wave amplitude being related to wave energy. They will write a cause and effect statement in their journal relating the amount of energy to the resulting wave amplitude.

 

Episode 4: Students will observe that changing the energy of a sound wave changes how we hear it by placing ringing tuning forks in water. They will then use musical instruments, computer and physical simulation models to identify that changing the amplitude and wavelength of a sound wave causes us to hear different volumes and notes.


 

Episode 5: In this episode students will observe that visible light can be split into different colors. They will use a video and a computer simulation model to discover that the types of energy that are part of the electromagnetic spectrum, including visible light, are different only because of their wavelengths. The students will use computational thinking to plan and conduct an experiment to discover how changing the amplitude of a light wave causes us to see it differently.

Bacon Pancakes

Conceptual Understandings

The Nakalele Blowhole on Maui will blast water high into the air but it does not follow a regular pattern.

What is a wave? What are the parts of a wave?

Snapshot

Students will make observations about the Nakalele Blowhole phenomenon, come up with a possible explanation for the phenomenon, and ask questions about the patterns they observed. They will share their observations and questions with the class.

Episode 1

Question

What causes the Nakelele Blowhole to blast water a hundred feet into the air?

 

Episode 2

Question

What is a wave and what are the parts of a wave?

Snapshot

Students use computer simulation models and physical models to become familiar with what a wave is. They will identify examples of different types of waves and the parts of a wave They will identify that energy is transferred by a wave, not matter.

Conceptual Understandings

Waves transfer energy from one place to another. Two main kinds of waves are longitudinal and transverse waves. The maximum vertical displacement of a wave is its amplitude while the distance the wave travels before it repeats is the wavelength. Frequency is the number of wave peaks that pass a point in a given amount of time.

How is energy connected to the amplitude and wavelength of a wave

 

Conceptual Understandings

There is a pattern between the amplitude of a wave and the energy it contains. The higher the amplitude, the higher the energy. This characteristic is true for many different types of energy waves.

What do you hear as the wavelength changes?

 

What do you hear as the amplitude changes?

Snapshot

Students conduct an experiment to discover how wave height (amplitude) is related to wave energy. They will transform gravitational potential energy to mechanical wave energy by dropping an object from different heights into a bin half filled with water. Using computational thinking the students will graph their results and describe the patterns they observe between the initial energy of the object and the resulting water motion.

They will then practice interpreting graphs of real data to recognize that there is a pattern of wave amplitude being related to wave energy. They will write a cause and effect statement in their journal relating the amount of energy to the resulting wave amplitude.

Episode 3

Question

How is energy connected to the amplitude and wavelength of a wave?

 

Episode 4

Question

What do you hear as the wavelength changes?


What do you hear as the amplitude changes?

Snapshot

Students will observe that changing the energy of a sound wave changes how we hear it by placing ringing tuning forks in water. They will then use musical instruments, computer and physical simulation models to identify that changing the amplitude and wavelength of a sound wave causes us to hear different volumes and notes.

Conceptual Understandings

Long wavelengths produce low sounds; short wavelengths produce high sounds.

High amplitudes (blowing harder = more energy) produce loud sounds; low amplitudes produce soft sounds.

What do you see as the wavelength changes?

What do you see as the amplitude changes?

What happens to the wave energy as it goes away from the source?

 

Conceptual Understandings

The amount of light energy decreases rapidly as distance from the source increases because the amplitude of the light waves is decreasing.

Snapshot

In this episode students will observe that visible light can be split into different colors. They will use a video and a computer simulation model to discover that the types of energy that are part of the electromagnetic spectrum, including visible light, are different only because of their wavelengths. The students will use computational thinking to plan and conduct an experiment to discover how changing the amplitude of a light wave causes us to see it differently.

Episode 5

Question

What do you see as the wavelength changes?

 

What do you see as the amplitude changes?

 

What happens to the wave energy as it goes away from the source?