Site Feedback

Utah Science

Curriculum Consortium

Tyson Grover 

tgrover@dsdmail.net

Annette Nielson

afonnesbeck@dsdmail.net

Standard 6.1

Standard 6.1.1
 

Develop and use a model of the Sun-Earth-Moon system to describe the cyclic patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the Sun and Moon, and seasons. Examples of models could be physical, graphical, or conceptual.

Practices

Developing and Using Models

  • Develop and use a model to describe phenomena

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS1.A: The Universe and Its Stars  

  • Patterns of the apparent motion of the sun, the moon, and stars in the sky can be observed, described, predicted, and explained with models.

ESS1.B: Earth and the Solar System  

  • This model of the solar system can explain eclipses of the sun and the moon. Earth’s spin axis is fixed in direction over the short-term but tilted relative to its orbit around the sun. The seasons are a result of that tilt and are caused by the differential intensity of sunlight on different areas of Earth across the year.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Patterns

  • Patterns can be used to identify cause-and-effect relationships.

Big Idea

The moon changes shape over time in and has cyclical patterns.

 
Standard 6.1.2

Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity and inertia in orbital motions of objects in our solar system.

Practices

Developing and Using Models

  • Develop and use a model to describe phenomena

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS1.A: The Universe and Its Stars

  • Earth and its solar system are part of the Milky Way galaxy, which is one of many galaxies in the universe.

ESS1.B: Earth and the Solar System  

  • The solar system consists of the sun and a collection of objects, including planets, their moons, and asteroids that are held in orbit around the sun by its gravitational pull on them.  

  • The solar system appears to have formed from a disk of dust and gas, drawn together by gravity.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Systems

  • Models can be used to represent systems and their interactions.

Big Idea

Planets stay in an orbital pattern around the sun.

Standard 6.1.3
 

Use computational thinking to analyze data and determine the scale and properties of objects in the solar system. Examples of scale could include size and distance. Examples of properties could include layers, temperature, surface features, and orbital radius. Data sources could include Earth and space-based instruments such as telescopes and satellites. Types of data could include graphs, data tables, drawings, photographs, and models.

Practices

Analyzing and Interpreting Data

  • Analyze and interpret data to determine similarities and differences in findings.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS1.B: Earth and the Solar System  

  • The solar system consists of the sun and a collection of objects, including planets, their moons, and asteroids that are held in orbit around the sun by its gravitational pull on them.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Scale and Proportion

  • Time, space, and energy phenomena can be observed at various scales using models to study systems that are too large or too small.

Big Idea

Planets differ from one another because of their individual properties.