Site Feedback

Utah Science

Curriculum Consortium

Tyson Grover 

tgrover@dsdmail.net

Annette Nielson

afonnesbeck@dsdmail.net

Strand 7.2 has been refreshed and reordered. Make sure you go through the storylines in the order laid out on this page.

 
Standard 7.2.4

Develop and use a scale model of the matter in the Earth's interior to demonstrate how differences in density and chemical composition (silicon, oxygen, iron, and magnesium) cause the formation of the crust, mantle and core.

Practices

Developing and using models

  • Develop and use a model to describe phenomena.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS2.A: Earth’s Materials and Systems

  • All Earth processes are the result of energy flowing and matter cycling within and among the planet’s systems. This energy is derived from the sun and Earth’s hot interior. The energy that flows and matter that cycles produce chemical and physical changes in Earth’s materials and living organisms.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Cause and Effect: mechanism and explanation

  • Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems.

Big Idea

The interior of the Earth has layers.

Standard 7.2.1
Cross Cutting Concepts

Energy and Matter

  • Within a natural or designed system, the transfer of energy drives the motion and/or cycling of matter.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS2.A: Earth’s Materials and Systems

  • All Earth processes are the result of energy flowing and matter cycling within and among the planet’s systems. This energy is derived from the sun and Earth’s hot interior. The energy that flows and matter that cycles produce chemical and physical changes in Earth’s materials and living organisms.

Develop and use a model of the rock cycle to describe the relationship between energy flow and matter cycling that create igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Emphasize  the processes of melting, crystallization, weathering, deposition, sedimentation, and deformation, which act together to form minerals and rocks.

Practices

Developing Models

  • Develop and use a model to describe phenomena.

Big Idea

Rocks are constantly changing.

 
 
Standard 7.2.6

Make an argument from evidence for how the geologic time scale shows the age and history of Earth. Emphasize scientific evidence from rock strata, the fossil record, and the principles of relative dating, such as superposition, uniformitarianism and recognizing unconformities.

Practices

Engaging in argument from evidence

  • Construct an oral and written argument supported by empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support or refute an explanation or a model for a phenomenon or a solution to a problem.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS1.C-The History of Planet Earth

  • The geologic time scale interpreted from rock strata provides a way to organize Earth’s history. Analyses of rock strata and the fossil record provide only relative dates, not an absolute scale.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Scale, proportion, and quantity

  • Time, space, and energy phenomena can be observed at various scales using models to study systems that are too large or too small.

Big Idea

Layers of rock provide evidence of Earth’s history.

Standard 7.2.5
 

Ask questions and analyze and interpret data about the patterns between plate tectonics and:

(1) the occurrence of earthquakes and volcanoes,

(2) continental and ocean floor features

(3) the distribution of rocks and fossils.

Examples could include identifying patterns on maps of earthquakes and volcanoes relative to plate boundaries, the shapes of the continents, the locations of ocean structures (including mountains, volcanoes, faults, and trenches), and similarities of rock and fossil types on different continents.

Practices

Asking questions or defining problems

  • Ask questions to identify the pattern

Analyzing and interpreting data

  • Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for phenomena.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS2.C-The History of Planet Earth  

  • Tectonic processes continually generate new ocean sea floor at ridges and destroy old sea floor at trenches.

ESS2.B-Plate Tectonics and Large Scale System Interactions  

  • Maps of ancient land and water patterns, based on investigations of rocks and fossils, make clear how Earth’s plates have moved great distances, collided, and spread apart.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Patterns

  • Patterns in rates of change and other numerical relationships can provide information about natural systems.

Big Idea

Patterns found on Earth are evidence of plate tectonics.

Standard 7.2.2
 

Construct an explanation based on evidence for how processes have changed Earth’s surface at varying time and spatial scales. Examples of processes that occur at varying time scales could include slow plate motions or rapid landslides. Examples of processes that occur at varying spatial scales could include uplift of a mountain range or deposition of fine sediments.

Practices

Constructing explanations and designing solutions

  • Construct a scientific explanation based on valid and reliable evidence obtained from sources (including the students’ own experiments) and the assumption that theories and laws that describe nature operate today as they did in the past and will continue to do so in the future.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS2.A: Earth’s Materials and Systems  

  • The planet’s systems interact over scales that range from microscopic to global in size, and they operate over fractions of a second to billions of years. These interactions have shaped Earth’s history and will determine its future.

ESS2.C: The Roles of Water in Earth's Surface Processes

  • Water’s movements—both on the land and underground—cause weathering and erosion, which change the land’s surface features and create underground formations.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Scale, proportion, and quantity

  • Time, space, and energy phenomena can be observed at various scales using models to study systems that are too large or too small

Big Idea

The speed at which Earth’s surface changes can vary.

Standard 7.2.3
 

Ask questions to identify constraints of specific geologic hazards and evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining the stability of human engineered structures such as homes, roads and bridges.  Examples of geologic hazards could include earthquakes, landslides, or floods.

Practices

Asking questions or defining problems

  • Define a design problem that can be solved through the development of an object, tool, process or system and includes multiple criteria and constraints, including scientific knowledge that may limit possible solutions.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ETS1.A: Defining and Delimiting Engineering Problems  

  • The more precisely a design task’s criteria and constraints can be defined, the more likely it is that the designed solution will be successful. Specification of constraints includes consideration of scientific principles and other relevant knowledge that are likely to limit possible solutions.


ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions

  • There are systematic processes for evaluating solutions with respect to how well they meet the criteria and constraints of a problem.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Stability and Change

  • Stability might be disturbed either by sudden events or gradual changes that accumulate over time.

Big Idea

Structures are engineered to withstand geologic hazards.