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Utah Science

Curriculum Consortium

Tyson Grover 

tgrover@dsdmail.net

Annette Nielson

afonnesbeck@dsdmail.net

Big Idea
  • Geological processes affect the uneven distribution of resources.

  • Why are coal resources plentiful in central Utah but scarce in northern Utah?

Practices

Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions

  • Construct a scientific explanation based on valid and reliable evidence obtained from sources (including the students’ own experiments) and the assumption that theories and laws that describe the natural world operate today as they did in the past and will continue to do so in the future.

Standard 8.4.1
Cross Cutting Concepts

Cause and Effect

  • Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict Anchor Phenomena in natural or designed systems.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS3.A: Natural Resources  

  • Humans depend on Earth’s land, ocean, atmosphere, and biosphere for many different resources. Minerals, fresh water, and biosphere resources are limited, and many are not renewable or replaceable over human lifetimes. These resources are distributed unevenly around the planet as a result of past geologic processes.

Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence that shows that the uneven distribution of Earth's mineral, energy, and groundwater resources is caused by geological processes. Examples of uneven distribution of resources could include Utah's unique geologic history that led to the formation and irregular distribution of natural resources like copper, gold, natural gas, oil shale, silver and uranium.

 
Standard 8.4.2
 

Engage in argument supported by evidence about the effect of per capita consumption of natural resources on Earth’s systems.  Emphasize that these resources are limited and may be non-renewable.  Examples of evidence include rates of consumption of food and natural resources such as freshwater, minerals, and energy sources.

Practices

Engaging in Argument from Evidence

  • Construct an oral and written argument supported by empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support or refute an explanation or a model for a phenomenon or a solution to a problem.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth Systems  

  • Typically as human populations and per-capita consumption of natural resources increase, so do the negative impacts on Earth unless the activities and technologies involved are engineered otherwise.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Cause and Effect

  • Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict Anchor Phenomena in natural or designed systems.

Big Idea
  • Per capita consumption affects the availability of natural resources.

  • How much water do I use (drinking, cooking, showering, irrigation) and is my usage responsible considering the availability of water in Utah?

Standard 8.4.3
 

Design a solution to monitor or mitigate the potential effects of the use of natural resources. Evaluate competing design solutions using a systematic process to determine how well each solution meets the criteria and constraints of the problem. Examples of uses of the natural environment could include agriculture, conservation efforts, recreation, solar energy, and water management.

Practices

Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions

  • Apply scientific principles to design an object, tool, process or system.

Engaging in Argument from Evidence

  • Evaluate competing design solutions based on jointly developed and agreed-upon design criteria.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth Systems

  • Typically as human populations and per-capita consumption of natural resources increase, so do the negative impacts on Earth unless the activities and technologies involved are engineered otherwise.

ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions

  • There are systematic processes for evaluating solutions with respect to how well they meet the criteria and constraints of a problem

Cross Cutting Concepts

Cause and Effect

  • Relationships can be classified as causal or correlational, and correlation does not necessarily imply causation.

Big Idea
  • There are consequences for using natural resources.

  • What natural resources do I use and what can I do to reduce the amount I use?

Standard 8.4.4
 

Analyze and interpret data on the factors that change global temperatures and their effects on regional climates. Examples of factors could include agricultural activity, changes in solar radiation, fossil fuel use, and volcanic activity. Examples of data could include graphs of the atmospheric levels of gases, seawater levels, ice cap coverage, human activities, and maps of global and regional temperatures.

Practices

Analyzing and Interpreting Data

  • Analyze and interpret data to determine similarities and differences in findings.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS3.D: Global Climate Change  

  • Human activities, such as the release of greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels, are major factors in the current rise in Earth’s mean surface temperature (global warming). Reducing the level of climate change and reducing human vulnerability to whatever climate changes do occur depend on the understanding of climate science, engineering capabilities, and other kinds of knowledge, such as understanding of human behavior and on applying that knowledge wisely in decisions and activities.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Stability and Change

  • Stability might be disturbed either by sudden events or gradual changes that accumulate over time.

Cause and Effects

  • Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict Anchor Phenomena in natural systems.

Big Idea
  • There are factors that affect regional climates and global temperatures.

  • How have global temperatures changed in the last century and what might be responsible for those changes?

Standard 8.4.5
 

Analyze and interpret patterns of the occurrence of natural hazards to forecast future catastrophic events and investigate how data are used to develop technologies to mitigate their effects. Emphasize how some natural hazards, such as volcanic eruptions and severe weather, are preceded by phenomena that allow prediction, but others, such as earthquakes, may occur without warning.

Practices

Analyzing and Interpreting Data

  • Analyze and interpret data to determine similarities and differences in findings.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS3.B: Natural Hazards  

  • Mapping the history of natural hazards in a region, combined with an understanding of related geologic forces can help forecast the locations and likelihoods of future events.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Patterns

  • Graphs, charts, and images can be used to identify patterns in data.

Big Idea
  • There are patterns in the occurrences of natural hazards and these patterns can be used to predict future catastrophic events.

  • Why does Oklahoma get many strong tornadoes each year while Utah only gets a few small ones?